Cisco ‘Connected Grid’ Routers and Switches Help Utilities, Environment

26/05/2010 at 11:46 am Leave a comment

Author: Ed Silverstein

Cisco (NewsAlert) has announced its first Connected Grid products – starting with routers and switches – that will help utilities deliver electric power from generation facilities to businesses and homes, resulting in better energy management, as well as improved environmental conditions.

 The specially designed routers and switches provide a secure solution for utility substations to integrate IP-based communications with the power grid for improved monitoring and control, Cisco said.

The technology builds on existing Cisco Smart Grid products which increase grid reliability and industry compliance.

Features of the new products include:

  • The Cisco 2010 Connected Grid Router and Cisco 2520 Connected Grid Switch were designed to meet utility substation requirements.  
  • The CGR 2010 and CGS 2520 capture and analyze information from electronic devices in the substation.
  • The products help utilities to better manage and maintain power transmission and distribution equipment, as well as increase the reliability of power delivery by quickly identifying, isolating, diagnosing and, at times, automatically repairing faults.
  • The products also help utilities better integrate renewable energy into the grid.
  • The products also extend network-based security and management to substations, supporting remote engineering access and proactive maintenance programs.
  • The products are based on Cisco IOS software.

The 2000 Series Connected Grid Routers and 2500 Series Connected Grid Switches give users comprehensive cyber security. The products also meet or exceed standards for utility substation environments, including the ability to withstand a broad range of temperatures, as well as extended protection against electrical surges and electromagnetic interference.

The expansion of a global smart grid will bring substantial environmental benefits, according to Cisco. The Climate Group reported that implementation of smart grid technology could globally reduce CO2e emissions by 2.03 gigatons. A recent report by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory predicts a 12 percent reduction in global energy and CO2 emissions if smart grid technologies are deployed.

The GridWise Alliance, of which Cisco is a member, estimates that smart grid incentives and investments will also create approximately 280,000 jobs. 

“Cisco’s vision is to help utilities transform energy production, distribution and consumption using an end-to-end, IP-based communications infrastructure to more sustainably meet the world’s future energy needs,” said Laura Ipsen (NewsAlert), senior vice president and general manager, Cisco Smart Grid. “Our Connected Grid portfolio represents the foundation of this innovative energy platform that will improve the electrical grid’s efficiency and create exciting opportunities for utilities as well as new consumer energy services. With our substation automation solutions at the core, we look forward to helping utilities achieve their business and operational goals.”

“Implementation of Smart Grid solutions such as transmission and distribution automation, combined with the behavioral changes they would enable, has the potential to significantly reduce CO2 emissions on a global scale,” added Molly Webb, director of strategic engagement, The Climate Group.

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Entry filed under: Renewable Energy.

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